Definition of timing

The ease with which a player is generating cue power, due to well-timed acceleration of the cue at the appropriate point in a shot.

24 Random Essential Billiards Terms

This is a slang term created by Freddy Bentivegna to refer to a cluster of balls on your side of the table that do not lend to easy pocketing in a game of one pocket.
To win an inning that counters a good game your opponent just won.
The inning win that counters a good game your opponent just won.
This term refers to a foul in snooker golf.
This is a version of double elimination tournament play that splits the field of competitors into two brackets that come together for a single elimination championship game.
Play, from the opening break shot until one player has won (or the game has been halted for some reason by a referee). Games are the units that make up matches, races (in some senses of that term) and rounds. Essentially the same as frame, except with regards to straight pool, which is a multi-rack game.
A well calculated successful slop shot that is usually hit a little harder than it should be and results in a pocketed ball or two without any fouls.
A situation in which a ball strikes another ball which is close to a rail and the struck ball rebounds back into the ball it was hit by; usually but not always unintended.
A predetermined, fixed number of games players must win to win a match; "a race to seven" means whomever wins seven games first wins the match.
This is a timing device for monitoring and restricting shot times for a player.
In snooker and other British usages, a break of 50-99 points (100 points or more being called a century), which involves potting at least 12 consecutive balls (i.e. the last 3 reds with at least 2 blacks and a pink, followed by all the colours).
When a successful non penalized break is achieved which gives the object balls a broad spread on the table.
Artistic pool is a trick shot competition, inspired by the related discipline of artistic billiards.
Slang for a mechanical bridge.
This playing to a number less than eight in a game of one pocket.
This is when a ball is spotted because of a foul or a handicap.
Same as foot spot. Chiefly British today, but also an American usage ca. World War I.
This is a particular shot where the potential for a miscue is higher because of the amount of draw that is attempted on the cue ball.
A rack in the form of an equilateral triangle. There are different sizes of triangles for racking different games (which use different ball sizes and numbers of balls), including the fifteen ball racks for snooker and various pool games such as eight-ball and blackball. A larger triangle is used for the twenty-one ball rack for baseball pocket billiards). The smallest triangle rack is employed in three-ball (see illustration at that article) but is not strictly necessary, as the front of a larger rack can be used, or the balls can be arranged by hand.
The object balls in triangular formation, before the break shot, after being racked. See also pyramid.
A type of spin imparted to the cue ball to make it rebound from a cushion at a shallower angle than it would if the spin had not been used.
The ACS Canadian affiliate organization, the Canadian Cue Sport Association.
To intentionally miss a shot (that results in a foul) in order to create a position for the cue ball that makes it hard for the other player to execute their shot. Not to be confused with a "Safety", since a safety is a legal hit.
This is the white ball in carom games which is separated from the clear ball by a marking (usually a dot or spot).
Also lady's aid or girly stick. A denigrating term for the mechanical bridge.
An imaginary line dividing the table into two equal halves lengthwise. It intersects the head string, center string and foot string at the head spot, center spot and foot spot, respectively.