Definition of string off

Also string off. Chiefly British; Obsolete: Same as string or lag.

24 Random Essential Billiards Terms

Same as follow (top spin).
Chiefly American: The short rail at the foot of the table. Frequently used imprecisely, to mean foot cushion. Compare top rail; contrast head rail.
Chiefly British: The half of the table from which the break shot is taken. This usage is conceptually opposite that in North America, where this end of the table is called the head.
In snooker, where the cue ball is resting in contact with another ball. If this ball is a ball that may legally be hit, then it is allowable to simply hit away from it and it counts as having hit it in the shot. If the ball moves, then a push shot must have occurred, in which case it is a foul.
A ball that is easily made from many positions on the table but which is left untouched while the rack is played, so that in the event the player gets out of position, the shooter has an insurance shot. Typically an insurance ball will be in or near the jaws of a pocket.
This refers to a shot that is not banked, does not hit a rail and goes into the pocket without contacting any other balls on the table.
An abrasive tip tool used as a grinder to roughen the cue tip to better hold chalk after it has become hardened and smooth from repeated impacts with the cue ball. Tappers serve the same purpose, but are used differently. Similar to a shaper, but shallower and less rough.
A British term for a pot that requires very fine contact between cue ball and object ball. See also feather.
This term is much like rain table and refers to a table is playing soggy due to humid conditions.
This describes a shot where you bank the object ball off of a rail and then sink it in a side pocket.

1- A tip tool with fine, sharp points used to roughen the cue tip to better hold chalk after it has become hardened and smooth from repeated impacts with the cue ball. Tappers are firmly tapped on or pressed against the tip. Scuffers serve the same purpose, but are used differently.

2- Describes a shot where one has a chance to miscue. Usually heard in reference to long draw shots. As in, "It's a tip-tapper!".

Chiefly British: bank shot played up and down the longer length of the table off a short rail and into a corner pocket, as opposed to the more common bank across the short length into a center pocket or corner.
To play a shot with the stroke and speed that makes it easiest to pocket the object ball, even at the expense of sacrificing position.
Either of the two shorter rails on a standard pool, billiards or snooker table. Contrast side rail/long rail.
In three cushion billiards, the most standard shot where the third ball is advantageously placed in a corner.
Any shot where the cue ball stops immediately after hitting an object ball. Generally requires a full hit.
A three cushion billiards shot in which the cue ball first strikes two cushions before hitting the first object ball then hits a third cushion before hitting the second object ball. So called because the shot opens up like an umbrella after hitting the third rail. Umbrella shots may be classified as inside or outside depending on which side of the first object ball the cue ball contacts.
Chiefly American: The short rail at the head of the table. Traditionally this is the rail on which the table manufacturer's logo appears. Compare bottom rail, baulk rail; contrast foot rail.
Also on the lemon. Disguising the level of one's ability to play.
This is the act of keeping your ball location advantages the way they are, and not allowing your opponent to even things out in the game of one pocket.
When complete focus allows you to execute quality billiards play with simplicity and seeming ease.
This is the act of disturbing you opponents good looking balls in the hope that they might move over and help you out in the game of one pocket.
The pocket in snooker that is closest to the green spot.
This is a particular shot where the potential for a miscue is higher because of the amount of draw that is attempted on the cue ball.