Definition of snooze you loose

This is a style of play where the player is required to stay on top of all the scoring practices. Scratches and points will disappear if they are not remembered.

24 Random Essential Billiards Terms

When the rules of the opening break are broken. Ex: If not enough balls contact with rails off the break.
When two objects balls are lined up so that you aim to pocket the nearest object ball, the second object ball will pocket. "That was an easy combination shot, the six ball was wired to the four ball". Also wired combination/combo, wired kiss.
This is a bank in which the object ball hit will cross the path of the cue ball on the way to its destination.
Same as feather (US) or snick (UK)
Also straight eight-ball. Same as bar pool. Not to be confused with the games of straight pool or straight rail.
Means either push out or push shot, depending on the context.
This is a ball that is left in a position that allows an easy shot, while time is spent working with other balls to better your position in the game.
This playing to a number less than eight in a game of one pocket.
This shot refers to using heavy follow to push through an object ball on its way to its destination.
A term applied especially in snooker for a type of double off three cushions, e.g. around the baulk colours and into a centre pocket. Such a shot is very difficult to make and would not normally be played as anything more than a shot for nothing.
To bungle a shot in a manner that leaves the table in such a fortuitous position for the opponent that there is a strong likelihood of losing the game or match. Contrast sell out.
In one pocket pool this means that you change your play based on where the count is during the game. If you are ahead you might choose more conservative shots, and if you are behind you could choose more aggressive shots.
A joint type which makes it possible to screw and unscrew the butt and shaft very quickly; faster than standard threads.
A pool room employee who plays with a good degree of skill.
This is an attempt where one player answers the other players successful shot or run with a successful shot or run.
Also called a rake. A special stick with a grooved, slotted or otherwise supportive end attachment that helps guide the cue stick - a stand-in for the bridge hand. It is usually used only when the shot cannot be comfortably reached with a hand bridge. Often shortened to bridge or called a bridge stick. An entire class of different mechanical bridges exist for snooker, called rests (see that entry for details), also commonly used in blackball and English billiards.
Also smalls, small ones, small balls. In eight-ball, to be shooting the solid suit (group) of balls (1 through 7); "you're the small one" or "I've got the smalls". Compare little, solids, reds, low, spots, dots, unders; contrast big.
The heavy, finely milled rock (slate) that forms the bed of the table, beneath the cloth. Major slate suppliers for the billiards industry are Italy, Brazil and China. Some cheaper tables, and novelty tables designed for outdoor use, do not use genuine slate beds, but artificial materials such as Slatrol.
To reach a certain position in a tournament. "I placed 17th." "She will probably place in the money this time."
In the UK, one of the two pockets one either side of a pool, snooker or English billiards table halfway up the long rails.
This is a ball that is positioned near your pocket that can be used to kiss off of when sinking another object ball.
A ball positioned near a pocket so that a particularly positioned object ball shot at that pocket will likely go in off it, even if aimed so imperfectly that if the warrior was absent, the shot would likely result in a miss. Usually arises when a ball is being banked to a pocket.
Side spin on the cue ball that causes it to unnaturally roll off a cushion (contacted at an angle) against rather than with the ball's momentum and direction of travel. If angling into a cushion that is on the right, then reverse english would be right english, and vice versa. The angle of deflection will be steeper (narrower) than if no english were applied. The opposite of running english, which has effects other than simply the opposites of those of reverse english.
"Pocket billiards," or a game in which balls are shot into pockets.