Definition of sitter

Chiefly British: Same as duck, and stemming from the same obvious etymology.

24 Random Essential Billiards Terms

A shot in which the cue ball is driven to one or more rails (cushions in British English) before reaching its intended target-usually an object ball. Sometimes also known as "Kick Out" or "Skid" (British)
Short for right english (side), i.e. side spin imparted to the cue ball by stroking it to the right-hand side of its vertical axis. Contrast left.
Artistic pool is a trick shot competition, inspired by the related discipline of artistic billiards.
This is an object ball that essentially covers up a path necessary for sinking the desired object ball.
Chiefly British: The rail at the Top of the table. Compare foot rail; contrast Bottom rail.
The angle from which a ball rebounds from a rail, as measured from the perpendicular to the rail.
Chiefly American: The short rail at the head of the table. Traditionally this is the rail on which the table manufacturer's logo appears. Compare bottom rail, baulk rail; contrast foot rail.
This describes a shot where you bank the object ball off of a rail and then sink it in a side pocket.
Verb: "To Clock" To carefully note the abilities or betting inclinations of other players for future reference.
This describes balls that are not able to be made in a pocket, either because they are high up on the table, in a different pocket, or in a cluster that makes the shot difficult. This condition of being out of play obviously exists on different difficulty levels.
In three cushion billiards, the most standard shot where the third ball is advantageously placed in a corner.
This is to use running english or soft speed in order to open up the angle on a particular bank shot.
This is a method of handicapping that designates a wild ball for a lesser player to be able to pocket at any point during a game in order to win.
Any ball that may be legally struck by the cue ball.
The placement of player(s) automatically in a tournament where some have to qualify, or automatic placement in later rounds.
This is the raised portion on the side of the table; the cushions are essentially rubber bumpers covered in the table cloth.
This is any game of pool played with money on the line. You can "put some action" on the game.
Given to the opposite player after a scratch on the cue ball has been played. This means the player with the cue ball in hand can position it wherever on the table he pleases. Sometimes there are restrictions as to where on the table the ball can be placed: in the kitchen, within the half circle, within the D. This is also known as cue ball in hand.
This refers to how a player is playing on a particular occasion (a player's skill level). If their game is good, then they are at a high speed, but if they are not playing up to their potential, then they are playing at a lower speed.
This is to miss your shot but either luckily or on purpose leave your opponent with nothing to shoot at.
Chiefly British: Same as shark (senses 1, 2). The term appears in lyrics from The Mikado (1884) in relation to billiards, and developed from sharper (in use by at least 1681, but now obsolete) meaning "hustler" but not specific to billiards.
A shot that only a novice or fool would take. Usually because it is a guaranteed scratch or other foul, or because it has a low percentage of being pocketed and is likely to leave the opponent in good position.
This refers to the cluster of balls remaining in a similar position to where they were within the break.
To intentionally rebound the cue ball off both of the pocket points to achieve position.