Definition of shooting system

This is a term used to refer to all the different aspects involved in setting up a shot, i.e. the stance, grip, bridge, and stoke.

24 Random Essential Billiards Terms

This describes a shot in carom games where the cue ball is driven all the way across the long rail, crossing the table, to score a point.
Describing a difficult pot: "the awkward cueing makes this shot missable."
This is a simple method of gambling where bets are determined between each game instead of playing matches.
Common slang in the US for a cheap, poorly made cue. Compare wood.
The collar is the portion of the joint that is attached to the top of the forearm. This is often stainless steel, wood, ivory, or molded phenolic resin, but in any case, made out of a solid material. This portion of the cue is glued on and threaded to reinforce the pin at the end of the shaft, and to offer a stabilized shot out of its solid construction.
Same as gapper
Certain rules say you must designate your shot before taking it. Generally this is just calling the ball to be sunk in which pocket, and is not dependent on touching rails or other balls, but very well can be.
British term referring to the base or metaphorical "feet" of a ball that rattles in the jaws of a pocket before eventually dropping. Usually said of an object ball for which the intention was to pot it.
The white ball struck by the cue (and so used to strike other colored, numbered, object balls) during play.
A type of rest, with a straight shaft and "x"-shaped head for resting the cue upon.
Either of the two shorter rails on a standard pool, billiards or snooker table. Contrast side rail/long rail.
To indicate where something is to be done. To "mark the pocket" means to indicate which pocket you intend to sink an object ball.
Sometimes called spots and stripes, stripes and solids or, more rarely, bigs and littles or highs and lows.
All fifteen numbered balls are used in a conventional triangle rack.
Each player is assigned either the solid balls (1-7) or the striped balls (9-15). The object is to pocket all of your assigned balls and then pocket the 8-ball.
Toward the head of the table. This is the playing area on the table above the middle pockets. The idea in an up table game is that shots are more difficult and further from the pockets in one pocket pool.
This is what happens when a player sends the cue ball into a cluster of balls that will in turn spread out in an unpredictable fashion.
A game of pool played on a table shaped like a rectangle, with or without pockets.
This is a kind of cue made of only two pieces of wood, and joined together using an advanced adhesive along the points of the cue. This connection gives the cue a flawless look and a fluid feel when shooting.
The angle from which a ball rebounds from a rail, as measured from the perpendicular to the rail.
Side spin on the cue ball that causes it to roll off a cushion (contacted at an angle) with rather than against the ball's natural momentum and direction of travel. If angling into a rail that is on the right, then running english would be left english, and vice versa. The angle of deflection will be wider than if no english were applied to the cue ball. But more importantly, because the ball is rolling instead of sliding against the rail, the angle will be more consistent. For this reason, running English is routinely used. Also called running side in British terminology. Contrast reverse english.
Either of the two shorter rails of a billiards or pocket billiards table.
When a player is playing flawlessly, just "cannot miss" and the game seems effortless.
The placement of player(s) automatically in a tournament where some have to qualify, or automatic placement in later rounds.
This is the act of keeping your ball location advantages the way they are, and not allowing your opponent to even things out in the game of one pocket.
A misnomer for hand talc.