Definition of saver

24 Random Essential Billiards Terms

This term refers to a foul in snooker golf.
This is a match where a player must win so many games more than the other player in order to win the match.
To sink a ball into a pocket.
This is a low bet in a game with action.
A type of rest, with a straight shaft and "x"-shaped head for resting the cue upon.
Having the cue ball stop precisely where intended.
Having the cue ball stop at or near the center of the table on a forceful break shot (the breaking ideal in many games such as nine-ball);
This is any game of pool played with money on the line. You can "put some action" on the game.
When you hit the object ball you are aiming for (or the manditory next ball) without the cue ball hitting other object balls first.
In snooker, a phrase used to describe a situation where the player has an easy pot and in general the balls are in a position to go on to make a sizeable break.
In eight-ball and related games, describes the situation in which neither player has yet claimed a suit (group) of balls. Often shortened to simply open: "Is it still an open table?" "Yes, it's open."
This is a timing device for monitoring and restricting shot times for a player.
A material, usually leather, placed on the end of a cue stick that comes in contact with the cue ball.
The Union Mondiale de Billard (French for World Union of Billiards) is the world governing body for carom (carambole) billiard games. The organization was founded in Madrid, Spain on 1 June 1959, and is dedicated to promoting the modern carom billiards games. The UMB monitors and controls international carom competitions and tournaments, and organizes an annual World Three-cushion Billiards Championship.
In team match play when playing one-on-one matches, if one team is short a player, a player on that team is called back to play a second match.
For example: Team A has 6 players, Team B has 4 players. There will be five individual matches played. For the fifth match Team A can pick a player from Team B to play a second match against their fifth match player.
Also the hook. In snooker, a type of mechanical bridge that has only recently been endorsed by the WPBSA to allow its use in major tournament play. It is a normal rest with the head in line with the shaft, but the last foot or so of the shaft is curved. This allows players to position the curved end around an obstructing ball that would have otherwise left them hampered on the cue ball and in need of a spider or swan with extensions, which would have less control.
Also lady's aid or girly stick. A denigrating term for the mechanical bridge.
One of the two pockets one either side of a pool table halfway up the long rails. They are cut shallower than corner pockets because they have a 180 degree aperture, instead of 90 degrees. In the UK the term centre pocket or middle pocket are preferred.
A shot in which the cue ball is struck above its equator with sufficient top spin to cause the cue ball to travel forward after it contacts an object ball. When a cue ball with follow on it contacts an object ball squarely (a center-to-center hit), the cue ball travels directly forward through the space previously occupied by the object ball (and can sometimes even be used to pocket a second ball). By contrast, on a cut shot, a cue ball with follow on it will first travel on the tangent line after striking the object ball, and then arc forward, widening the carom angle.
Chiefly American: The cushion on the head rail. Compare bottom cushion; contrast foot cushion.
In snooker, the colour ball worth 5 points, whose spot is at the center of the table.
This is to watch a match with such intensity that there is worry, usually because of a wager on the game.
A type of spin imparted to the cue ball to make it rebound from a cushion at a shallower angle than it would if the spin had not been used.
The triangular device, generally plastic, used to group the balls in a pyramid form prior to the beginning of a game.
Billiard Congress of America. The official governing body for pocket billiards in the United States.