Definition of sandbag

To disguise the level of one's ability to play in various ways such as using a lemonade stroke; intentionally missing shots; making an uneven game appear "close"; purposefully losing early, inconsequential games. Sandbagging is a form of hustling, and in handicapped leagues, considered a form of cheating. See also dump and on the lemonade.

24 Random Essential Billiards Terms

Pronounced "No-Rango". A norengo refers to what should be an easy straight in shot where the object ball is usually very close to the pocket. But the shooter strikes the ball harder than they should and the result is the object ball rattling out of the pocket and a missed shot.
Also see Lorengo.
A successful attempt to get out of a snooker.
The break box is a zone in the "kitchen" of the head (British: bottom) of the table, from which the break shot must be taken with the cue ball,
Describing a ball that is safe because it is in close proximity to one or more other balls, and would need to be developed before it becomes pottable.
In a tournament, to place high enough to receive a payout. E.g., in a tournament that pays from 1st down to 5th places, to be at least 5th place is to be in the money.
This is an object sometimes placed underneath the cue tip.
You can cheat the pocket by angling your shot to go in at the right or left of the pocket opening when sinking a shot. This permits the cue ball to strike the object ball at a different contact point than the most obvious one.
This is when it is necessary to change a set handicap after play indicates it favors one player more than the other.
When a ball is given as a handicap it often must be called (generally tacit). A wild handicap means the ball can be made in any manner specifically without being called.
When the object ball lies behind another ball which makes it impossible to be struck by the cue with a direct hit.
Chiefly British: Short for side spin. In Canadian usage, the term is sometimes used as a verb, "to side".
Confederation Panamerica of Billiards
A type of nurse shot used in English billiards in which two coloured balls are positioned on either side of the mouth of a snooker table pocket but not touching and, thus placed, can be successively contacted and scored off over and over by the cue ball without moving them.
The United States Snooker Association (USSA) is the internationally recognized governing body of the sport of snooker in the United States. Founded in 1991 by the British-born Michael Collins, the USSA is a member of the International Billiards and Snooker Federation (IBSF), the world governing body of non-professional English billiards and snooker, and is affiliated with the American CueSports Alliance (ACS).
This is a match where a player must win so many games more than the other player in order to win the match.
Same as foul
The ball required to guarantee victory in a match. Sometimes used figuratively to mean the last difficult ball required (chiefly British and usually used in multi-frame matches, particularly snooker).
A tournament format in which a player is out of the tournament after a single match loss.
Same as mechanical bridge; so-called because of its typical shape.
This is English that turns into reverse English after contact with the object ball. This will close up the angle on a bank.
Same as spot
Three equally spaced diamonds are normally between each pocket on a pool table. On a carom table, the pockets themselves are replaced by additional diamonds. Diamonds get their name from the shape of the markings traditionally used; though many today are round, square, etc., these rail markings are still referred to as "diamonds".
Also lady's aid or girly stick. A denigrating term for the mechanical bridge.
This shot is a minimally calculated distressed shot which makes it evident to the opponent you no longer have any hope to winning the game.