Definition of position

The placement of the balls, especially the cue ball, relative to the next planned shot. Also known as shape.

24 Random Essential Billiards Terms

A short, jabbed draw stroke usually employed so as to not commit a foul (i.e. due to following through to a double hit) when the cue ball is very near to the target object ball.
A 7 inch (17.8 cm) square box drawn on a balkline table from the termination of a balkline with the rail, thus defining a restricted space in which only 3 points may be scored before one ball must be driven from the area. It developed to curtail the effectiveness of the chuck nurse, which in turn had been invented to thwart the effectiveness of the Parker's box in stopping long, repetitive runs using the anchor nurse.
The pool player who is at the table taking their shot.
In certain carom billiards games, any shot in which the cue ball is sucessfully caromed off an object ball to strike another object ball (with or without contacting cushions in the interim) is a considered a billiards shot.
To reach a certain position in a tournament. "I placed 17th." "She will probably place in the money this time."
This is the ball that sits in the front, or apex, position in the rack.
A British term for someone with little experience or understanding of the game, who may be skilled at potting individual balls but does not consider tactics such as position or safety; "he's a potter not a player." See also banger.
Random method for pairing of opponents when setting up a bracket system for a tournament.
This is a ball that is resting on the edge of a pocket, and would be a very easy shot to pocket.
This is also used to describe the ball when it rests on the edge of the pocket, almost begging to drop.
The surface of the table used for play (often made with slate).

An attempt of a legal clean shot (not a slop shot) that goes badly wrong due to improper stroke, stance, table position or table conditions in which the result of the shot is completely unexpected and not what was predicted at all.

This is a version of double elimination tournament play that splits the field of competitors into two brackets that come together for a single elimination championship game.
This is to execute a shot where the cue ball is controlled perfectly and stops where you want it to exactly.
To play a shot with the stroke and speed that makes it easiest to pocket the object ball, even at the expense of sacrificing position.
To create contact with the cue ball or an object ball.
Often times a protective finish is applied to a cue stick after construction. A UV polyurethane is common, and this helps to protect the cue from fading and dings.
When the cue ball contacts three or more cushions in carom games.
Chiefly Australian: Same as a force follow shot.
This is English that turns into reverse English after contact with the object ball. This will close up the angle on a bank.
In snooker, a phrase used to describe a situation where the player has an easy pot and in general the balls are in a position to go on to make a sizeable break.
This is the running score of a player during his inning of play. The sum of the continuously scored points, or where the player stands in the run on the table.
Also straight eight-ball. Same as bar pool. Not to be confused with the games of straight pool or straight rail.
This is a type of shot that is executed by an object ball caroming off of another object ball in order to gain the pocket.
Also nurse shot, nursery shot. In carom games such as straight rail, balkline and cushion caroms, where all the balls are kept near each other and a cushion, and with very soft shots, can be "nursed" down a rail on multiple successful shots that effectively replicate the same ball setup so that the nurse shot can be repeated again (and again, etc.). Excessive use of nurse shots by players skilled enough to set them up and pull them off repeatedly at will is what led to the development of the balkline carom billiards game variations, and repetitive shot limitation rules in English billiards. A clear example of why: In 1907, Tom Reece scored a record break of 499,135 consecutive points over a period of five weeks, without a miss, using the cradle cannon nurse shot.