Definition of orange crush

The 5 out (meaning the player getting the handicap can win by making the 5, 6, 7, 8 or 9 balls).

24 Random Essential Billiards Terms

In snooker and other British usages, a break of 50-99 points (100 points or more being called a century), which involves potting at least 12 consecutive balls (i.e. the last 3 reds with at least 2 blacks and a pink, followed by all the colours).
In three cushion billiards, the most standard shot where the third ball is advantageously placed in a corner.
New Zealand Billiards and Snooker Association.
To allow an opponent to stop playing a set for money in exchange for something. If a player is winning a set by a wide margin, with $100 on the line, the player could say, "I'll let you out now for $75." This is usually meant to save pride.
In snooker, a pot into any of the corner pockets where the cue ball had started in the opposite lengthwise half of the table. In other words, a pot in which the cue ball or object ball crosses an imaginary line joining the middle pockets.
Play, from the opening break shot until one player has won (or the game has been halted for some reason by a referee). Games are the units that make up matches, races (in some senses of that term) and rounds. Essentially the same as frame, except with regards to straight pool, which is a multi-rack game.
Nickname for the nine ball, usually only used when playing the game 9-Ball.
An area defined on a billiard table, in games such as pool, snooker, English billiards and bagatelle, by a single balkline (drawn or imaginary) that runs across the table near the head (bottom) end; exactly where depends upon table type and size. This balk is where the cue ball is placed in lagging for lead, for making the opening break shot, and sometimes for other purposes, depending upon the game.
Any game which uses a rack composed of less than 15 balls.
A joint type in which the butt and shaft screw together in a tight lock, resulting in a better shot with more hitting power.
A shooter's body position and posture during a shot.
Same as visit.
When you have completed a shot by pocketing a ball into a pocket.
A player who was not shooting well during a match but suddenly turns it around and starts playing better and more accurately. Also known as "Finding a stroke" or "Found their stroke".
When the cue ball is tucked behind the corner of a pocket, therefore not allowing a direct shot at the object ball without it bouncing of the corner of the rail.
A semicircle with an 11½ inch (291 mm) radius, drawn behind a snooker table's baulk line, centred on the middle of the line, and resembling the upper case letter "D" in shape. The "D" is also used in English billiards and sometimes also in blackball and other pool games played on British-style tables.
A very thin cut shot in which the cue ball just brushes the edge of an object ball. "Feather" by itself can be both noun and verb (e.g. "feathering the ball").
This is to lay down the money on the table in a betting game before play begins to ensure pay up at the end.
Chiefly American: The cushion on the head rail. Compare bottom cushion; contrast foot cushion.
Describing a difficult pot: "the awkward cueing makes this shot missable."
A point bead on a scoring string.
Extreme application of draw. This when the draw back of the cue ball is your first priority, and you apply extra draw to the hit of the cue ball.
A pool ball that was meant to go into the pocket, but got caught up by the jaw and ended up bouncing back and forth before stopping short of the pocket.
This is when it is necessary to change a set handicap after play indicates it favors one player more than the other.