Definition of lengthen a bank

This is to use running english or soft speed in order to open up the angle on a particular bank shot.

24 Random Essential Billiards Terms

The angle from which a ball rebounds from a rail, as measured from the perpendicular to the rail.
The ornamentation on a cue is often made by inlaying exotic materials into the wood of the butt portion of the cue. Inlays of ebony and ivory are quite common. The value of a cue is often based on the number inlays.
This is a player who has the ability to make difficult shots in one pocket, because they are likely proficient at other pool games first.
To indicate where something is to be done. To "mark the pocket" means to indicate which pocket you intend to sink an object ball.
This is an imaginary player that you can attempt to run a rack against when playing a practice or training game.
Same as solids, in New Zealand. Compare little, small, reds, low, spots, dots; contrast overs.
To win an inning that counters a good game your opponent just won.
The inning win that counters a good game your opponent just won.
Artistic pool is a trick shot competition, inspired by the related discipline of artistic billiards.
Same as duck. Derives from an easily shot ball "hanging" in the pocket.
Describes the propensity of pockets to more easily accept an imperfectly aimed ball shot at a relatively soft speed, that might not fall if shot with more velocity ("that ball normally wouldn't fall but he hit it at pocket speed"). The less sensitive to shot-speed that a pocket is, the "faster" it is said to be.
Describes the velocity of an object ball shot with just enough speed to reach the intended pocket and drop. "Shoot this with pocket speed only, so you don't send the cue ball too far up-table."
This is a version of double elimination tournament play that splits the field of competitors into two brackets that come together for a single elimination championship game.
American Cuemakers Association. This organization was formed in 1992 to help bring value to the development and advancement of cues in the United states.
This is when, after playing an opponent for a while you both break even as far as money exchange, and the only person to get paid is the house for use of their table.
The area on the table behind the head string.
The origin of the term has been the subject of some speculation but the best explanation known is that in the 1800s, many homes did not have room for both a billiard table and a dining room table. The solution was a billiards table that had a cover converting it into a dining table. Kept in the dining room, play on such a table was often restricted by the size of the room, so it would be placed so that the head rail would face the connected kitchen door, thus affording a player room for the backswing without hitting a wall. A player was therefore either half or sometimes fully (literally) "in the kitchen" when breaking the balls.
This game is played on a smaller octagonal table filled with bumpers in the middle and two more bumpers surrounding a hole on each side of the table. The game is played by trying to sink the balls into the opposite pocket by hitting the object ball directly instead of using a cue ball.
Also money-added. Said of a tournament in which the pot of money to pay out to the winner(s) contains sponsor monies in addition to competitor entry fees. Often used as an adjective: "a money-added event".
The way in which a player holds the butt end of the cue stick.
The wrap of the cuestick where the hand is placed, also known as the "grip area."
Shooting at an object ball that is already in motion at the moment of shooting and cue ball impact; illegal in most games and usually only seen in exhibition/trick shots.
This is a type of shot that shows complete control over the object ball and the cue ball.
This refers to the distance of deflection that the ball comes off of the cue stick after a hit is applied with side spin on it.
The European Pocket Billard Federation is the European governing body for pocket billiards. EPBF is also one of the member organization of the WPA (World Pool Billard Association)
Also simply maximum. In snooker, the highest break attainable with the balls that are racked; usually 147 points starting by potting fifteen reds, in combination with blacks, and clearing the colours. Also called a 147 (one-four-seven). In six-red snooker, the maximum break is only 75 points, due to fewer red balls and thus fewer black-scoring opportunities.
A term applied especially in snooker for a type of double off three cushions, e.g. around the baulk colours and into a centre pocket. Such a shot is very difficult to make and would not normally be played as anything more than a shot for nothing.
Also straight eight-ball. Same as bar pool. Not to be confused with the games of straight pool or straight rail.