Definition of leave

The cue ball's position after a shot. "Good" or "bad" in reference to a leave describe respectively and advantageous or disadvantageous position for the next shot, or to leave an incoming opponent safe.

24 Random Essential Billiards Terms

Hitting the object ball with too large of a cut angle; hitting the object ball too thin. It is a well-known maxim that overcutting is preferable to undercutting in many situations, as is more often leaves the table in a disadvantageous position on the miss than does an undercut. See also professional side of the pocket.
Verb: "To Clock" To carefully note the abilities or betting inclinations of other players for future reference.
A common way to keep track of games won when playing for small money is to use a coin that is placed under the rail next to the diamonds on the rail. The center diamond at the head of the table is taken as zero, and each diamond from that is considered to be one game. To go 'around the world' is to beat your opponent so badly that the coin travels all the way around the diamonds on the table.
Derived from "sitting duck", usually referring to an object ball sitting close to a pocket or so positioned that is virtually impossible to miss. Same as hanger (US, colloquial), sitter (UK).
This is when a ball is spotted because of a foul or a handicap.
To sink a ball into a pocket.
This refers to the distance of deflection that the ball comes off of the cue stick after a hit is applied with side spin on it.
To move a ball (usually deliberately) from a safe position, e.g. close to the middle of a cushion or in a cluster, so that it becomes pottable.
Exact opposite of fast, all senses.
Common slang in the US for a cheap, poorly made cue. Compare wood.
A sleeve, fitted onto the lathed-down tip end of the cue, made from fiberglass, phenolic resin, brass, ivory, horn or antler, melamine, plastic, or other rigid material, upon which the cue tip is mounted and which protects the shaft wood from splitting from impact with the cue ball.
This is a term to describe 100 break points in a game of snooker.
Used in snooker in reference to the position of the cue ball. It is above the object ball if it is off-straight on the baulk cushion side of the imaginary line for a straight pot (e.g. "he'll want to finish above the blue in order to go into the pink and reds"). It is also common to use the term high instead.
A cluster of balls. In snooker, the bunch of reds that are typically left below the pink spot in the early stages of a frame, not including those reds that have been released into pottable positions.
In snooker, any of the three colour balls that get spotted on the baulk line: the yellow, green or brown ball.
This is a location where a player can go inexpensively to refine their pool skills. These establishments began as horserace betting houses, and are still often filled with games involving money action. If you get thirsty, many pool halls offer cold refreshments, however, be careful you are not there just for the refreshments. In that case, you may as well be playing at a bar with a bent cue on a rain table.
This is missing the fact that you owe a ball in a game of one pocket after a scratch.
This is an object sometimes placed underneath the cue tip.
This is to watch a match with such intensity that there is worry, usually because of a wager on the game.
This is a bank in one pocket pool that is sitting at an angle that makes it unsafe to play.
This refers to a shot that is not banked, does not hit a rail and goes into the pocket without contacting any other balls on the table.
When a ball is in firm contact with a cushion or another ball.
When the object ball banked of a rail goes directly in a pocket without kissing or touching any other object balls.
A misnomer for hand talc.