Definition of jump cue

A cue dedicated to jumping balls; usually shorter and lighter than a playing cue and having a wider, hard tip. Also referred to as a jump stick.

24 Random Essential Billiards Terms

The way in which a player holds the butt end of the cue stick.
The wrap of the cuestick where the hand is placed, also known as the "grip area."
This is to take all the money from a player or to have lost all of your own money.
The person who is a provider of all or part of a player's stake (money) for a gambling session in which one is not a player.
A slang term for a cue, usually used with "piece", as in "that's a nice piece of wood".
Also straight eight-ball. Same as bar pool. Not to be confused with the games of straight pool or straight rail.
A ball hanging over the edge of a pocket.
This is a shot that shows great control and positioning in where the cue will be when all the balls stop rolling.
Anything that causes a foul according to the rules of a game.
This is to watch a match with such intensity that there is worry, usually because of a wager on the game.
This is another name for One Pocket pool.
The Higher Education Snooker and Pool Council is a voluntary, not-for-profit organisation established to promote cue sports in institutions of higher education on the island of Ireland.
To win an inning that counters a good game your opponent just won.
The inning win that counters a good game your opponent just won.
This is a ball that is left in a position that allows an easy shot, while time is spent working with other balls to better your position in the game.
This is the imaginary line that a ball would need to follow in order for it to result in an effective bank shot.
This is a shot that is meant to remove one of your opponent's balls that lies near their pocket in the game of one pocket.
This is a shot involving contact between the cue ball and an object ball which allows the cue ball to contact another object in order to sink a pocket with the second object ball.
Common slang in the US for a cheap, poorly made cue. Compare wood.
A term applied especially in snooker for a type of double off three cushions, e.g. around the baulk colours and into a centre pocket. Such a shot is very difficult to make and would not normally be played as anything more than a shot for nothing.
To determine the order of play, players (representing only themselves, or teams) each simultaneously shoot a ball from the kitchen (or in British games, from the baulk line) to the end rail and back toward the bottom rail. Whichever shooter's ball comes to rest closest to the bottom rail gets to choose who breaks the rack. It is permissible but not required for the lagged ball to touch or rebound from the bottom rail, but not to touch the side rails. Lagging is usually a two-party activity, though there are games such as cutthroat in which three players might lag. In the case of a tie, the tying shooters re-lag. The lag is most often used in tournament play or other competitions. In hard-break games like nine-ball and eight-ball the winner of the lag would normally take the break, while in soft-break games like straight pool would likely require the loser of the lag to break, since breaking would be a disadvantage.
Same as foot spot. Chiefly British today, but also an American usage ca. World War I.
Chiefly American: The short rail at the head of the table. Traditionally this is the rail on which the table manufacturer's logo appears. Compare bottom rail, baulk rail; contrast foot rail.
The first shot in a game - aimed at a set of racked balls.
To execute the first shot in a new game.
In snooker this term can be use to indicate a series of successive shots completed by a single player.
This is a player that will regularly loose money to a particular player that is obviously a better player.
This is the ball that sits in the front, or apex, position in the rack.