Definition of jack up

To elevate the back of the cue on a shot.

24 Random Essential Billiards Terms

To create contact with the cue ball or an object ball.
A shot in which the cue ball is driven first to one or more rails, then hits an object ball and kisses back to the last rail contacted. It is a common shot in carom games, but can be applied to such an instance in any relevant cue sport.
Usually a one-piece cue freely available for use by patrons in bars and pool halls.
This is a shot where the cue ball caroms off a number of balls in a pin ball, back and forth, fashion to achieve a shot.
This refers to how a player is playing on a particular occasion (a player's skill level). If their game is good, then they are at a high speed, but if they are not playing up to their potential, then they are playing at a lower speed.
A tight, Spandex glove covering usually most or all of the thumb, index finger and middle finger, worn on the bridge hand as a more convenient and less messy alternative to using hand talc, and for the same purpose: a smooth-gliding stroke.
When you have completed a shot by pocketing a ball into a pocket.
This is a tip tool for cleaning the edges of you tip after mushrooming occurs.
Same as solids, in New Zealand. Compare little, small, reds, low, spots, dots; contrast overs.
When a ball is in firm contact with a cushion or another ball.
Also spot-stroke, spot hazard. A form of nurse shot in English billiards, in which the red ball, which must be spotted to a specific location after every time it is potted before another shot is taken, is potted in such as way as to leave the cue ball in position to repeat the same shot, permitting a skilled player to rack up many points in a single break (series of shots in one visit).
Chiefly British: The cushion on the top rail. Compare foot cushion; contrast bottom cushion.
In the game 9 Ball, making the nine ball early with a legal shot, but not on the break.
Also piquet. Either a massé shot with no english, or a shot in which the cue stick is steeply angled, but not held quite as vertical as it is in full massé.
(Chiefly U.S.) Side spin (english) placed on a same side of the cue ball as the direction in which the object ball is being cut (left-hand english when cutting a ball to the left, and vice versa). In addition to affecting cue ball position, inside english can increase throw.
To allow an opponent to stop playing a set for money in exchange for something. If a player is winning a set by a wide margin, with $100 on the line, the player could say, "I'll let you out now for $75." This is usually meant to save pride.
This refers to the distance of deflection that the ball comes off of the cue stick after a hit is applied with side spin on it.
When the tip of the cue begins to hang over the sides of the ferrule from constant use. This is the action of mushrooming, and it is important to use a tip tool to reshape the tip to fit the ferrule.
Also solid, solid ones, solid balls. The non-striped ball suit (group) of a fifteen ball set that are numbered 1 through 7 and have a solid color scheme (i.e., not including the 8 ball). As in, "I'm solid", or "you've got the solids". Compare low, small, little, reds, spots, dots, unders; contrast stripes.
Either of the two shorter rails on a standard pool, billiards or snooker table. Contrast side rail/long rail.
The point in match play where both players (or teams) need only one more game (frame) victory to win the match or race.
To play a shot using a more difficult application of stroke and speed to achieve a certain desired position for the next shot, even at the expense of or sharply increasing the likelihood of a miss.
Slang for a mechanical bridge.
This is an instance when the person not taking their turn interferes with the game play, this is recorded as a foul.