Definition of house cue

Usually a one-piece cue freely available for use by patrons in bars and pool halls.

24 Random Essential Billiards Terms

Named after their innovator, legendary cuemaker George Balabushka, Bushka rings are decorative bands of material incorporated into pool cues, commonly just above the wrap area, in the form of ebony and ivory blocks, or sometimes other materials, alternating in a checked pattern.
In snooker, the second-highest value colour ball, being worth six points.
A specific ball number followed by "out" refers to a handicap in nine-ball or other rotation games where the "spot" is all balls from that designated number to the money ball. To illustrate, the 6-out in a nine-ball game would allow the player getting weight to win by legally pocketing the 6, 7, 8 or 9 balls.
Short for run out, especially as a noun: "That was a nice out."
In snooker, the highest-value baulk colour, worth 4 points.
The point in match play where both players (or teams) need only one more game (frame) victory to win the match or race.
This is an imaginary player that you can attempt to run a rack against when playing a practice or training game.
On a shot, the extension of the cue stick through the cue ball position during the end of a player's stroke in the direction originally aimed.
A defensive action taken when a player either has no "makeable" or "high percentage" shot or chooses to leave his opponent in a difficult situation. It is a legal shot and is not considered to be dirty pool. A safety must still conform with the rule concerning hitting the correct ball first and striking a rail afterwards. If a correct ball is accidentally pocketed while playing safe, the shooter must continue to shoot.
A ball that is easily made from many positions on the table but which is left untouched while the rack is played, so that in the event the player gets out of position, the shooter has an insurance shot. Typically an insurance ball will be in or near the jaws of a pocket.
This is a fine powdery substance used to assist the sliding of the cue over the hand bridge.
To play even; without a handicap. Also called heads up.
A shot played slowly and with heavy draw and follow-through so that the cue ball can be struck firmly but with a lot of the pace taken out, allowing more control than just a gentle tap that would travel as far. Also called "Drag Draw".
A misnomer for hand talc.
This is the ball that sits in the front, or apex, position in the rack.
Chiefly British: Same as shark (senses 1, 2). The term appears in lyrics from The Mikado (1884) in relation to billiards, and developed from sharper (in use by at least 1681, but now obsolete) meaning "hustler" but not specific to billiards.
Anything that causes a foul according to the rules of a game.
This is the point on the object ball where the cue exactly impacts or the point at which two balls touch when they impact.
Also known as slop. To pocket a ball by luck; "he ratted in the 9 ball"; usually employed disapprovingly.
Jargon for a tournament chart, showing which players are playing against whom and what the results are. Often shortened to card.
Cueing and timing the balls well; in good form, where pocketing (potting), safety and clarity of thinking seem to come easily.
A cut shot in which if a line were drawn from the cue ball to the rail behind the targeted object ball, perpendicular to that rail, the object ball would lie beyond the line with respect to the pocket being targeted.
Chiefly British. This is a shot in a snooker game where the first object ball hit contacts another object ball and the second one is pocketed. If both of the balls are red, or if the second ball would be on if the first ball had not been deemed free then it is an allowed shot.
When the object ball lies behind another ball which makes it impossible to be struck by the cue with a direct hit.
This is when you strike a cue ball off center to gain control on the movement on the cue ball.