Definition of handicap

A players skill level, ball advantage or match advantage when using a handicapping system.

24 Random Essential Billiards Terms

This word is used as slang to define a player as amateur or recreational.
The 'Lady Jane Grey' is a rarely used term to describe a shot in the game of snooker. The cue ball is baulk side of the spotted black after potting a red ball. The black is powerfully potted into a top corner pocket and the cue ball bounces off the top cushion into the red balls, moving them into space, thus allowing the continuation of a break. Named after Lady Jane Grey, the 16th Century Queen of England, possibly because the speed the cue ball must be hit matches the speed with which she was deposed from the throne.
To indicate where something is to be done. To "mark the pocket" means to indicate which pocket you intend to sink an object ball.
In snooker, the highest-value colour ball on the table, being worth seven points. In some (especially American) snooker ball sets it is numbered "7" on its surface.
The black ball (usually numbered "8") in the eight-ball variant game blackball (and its variants); also the common British term for the slightly larger but otherwise identical 8 ball in a kelly pool set (a.k.a. American or WPA pool set).
Any standard pool cue used to shoot the majority of shots in a match.
A shot in which the cue ball is driven to one or more rails (cushions in British English) before reaching its intended target-usually an object ball. Sometimes also known as "Kick Out" or "Skid" (British)
The ball required to guarantee victory in a match. Sometimes used figuratively to mean the last difficult ball required (chiefly British and usually used in multi-frame matches, particularly snooker).
Same as duck. Derives from an easily shot ball "hanging" in the pocket.
Any shot where the cue ball is intentionally jumped into the air to clear an obstacle
This is a toned down masse shot. The cue is elevated a little and will curve a little in the direction the spin is applied. This is used to sneak around difficult shots.
A bridge formed by the hand where no finger loops over the shaft of the cue. Typically, the cue stick is channeled by a "v"-shaped groove formed by the thumb and the base of the index finger.
The placement of the balls, especially the cue ball, relative to the next planned shot. Also known as shape.
This is missing the fact that you owe a ball in a game of one pocket after a scratch.
A British term for a pot that requires very fine contact between cue ball and object ball. See also feather.
The material which covers the bed and cushions of a pool table. The cloth used to cover a pool table is very special and can come in a variety of grades. Along with the general quality of the table itself, the cloth play a very important role in how a particular table plays.
This is the state after which the person returning the break has had the opportunity to catch and even the field after the breakers advantage.
Also topspin, top-spin, top. Same as follow. Contrast bottom spin, back spin.
Australian: Defeated with all seven of one's object balls (in blackball or eight-ball) remaining on the table.
A ball positioned near a pocket so that a particularly positioned object ball shot at that pocket will likely go in off it, even if aimed so imperfectly that if the warrior was absent, the shot would likely result in a miss. Usually arises when a ball is being banked to a pocket.
This is what is brought to the table if you are playing at your best potential.
When a ball is in firm contact with a cushion or another ball.
Also known as slop. To pocket a ball by luck; "he ratted in the 9 ball"; usually employed disapprovingly.
A player who was not shooting well during a match but suddenly turns it around and starts playing better and more accurately. Also known as "Finding a stroke" or "Found their stroke".
A joint type in which the butt and shaft screw together in a tight lock, resulting in a better shot with more hitting power.