Definition of group

Same as suit, predominantly in British terminology, i.e., in eight-ball either of the set of seven balls (reds or yellows) that must be cleared before potting the black. Generally used in the generic, especially in rulesets or articles, rather than colloquially by players.

24 Random Essential Billiards Terms

This is what is brought to the table if you are playing at your best potential.
In snooker, to leave the cue ball ball on the spot of a colour ball after potting it. This is usually performed where re-spotting of the colour ball would cause positional problems for the player, such as blocking available pots on one or more red balls.
Used with an amount to signify money added to a tournament prize fund in addition to the amount accumulated from entry fees (e.g. "$500 added").
Same as mechanical bridge; so-called because of its typical shape.
Any shot that intentionally accounts for the elasticity of the cushions to allow a ball to bank past an otherwise blocking ball. The moving ball will sink in to the cushion very near the blocking ball giving it sufficient space to get past it or kiss off the back side of it.
Describing a shot which requires one or more balls to be played off several cushions, such as an elaborate escape or a positional shot; "he'll have to send the cue ball round the angles to get good position."
In snooker and other British usages, a break of 50-99 points (100 points or more being called a century), which involves potting at least 12 consecutive balls (i.e. the last 3 reds with at least 2 blacks and a pink, followed by all the colours).
Also on the lemon. Disguising the level of one's ability to play.
A rare and extremely difficult trick jump shot that turns into a massé upon landing. Requires very precise application of spin in addition to the precise application of ball pressure to effectuate the jump. Turn-of-the-20th-century World Balkline Champion Jacob Schaefer Sr. was known to daringly perform jump massés in competition.
Random method for pairing of opponents when setting up a bracket system for a tournament.
This is a term used in slang to reference the bridge tool.
Chiefly British: bank shot played up and down the longer length of the table off a short rail and into a corner pocket, as opposed to the more common bank across the short length into a center pocket or corner.
The angle at which a ball approaches a rail, as measured from the perpendicular to the rail.
This refers to the cluster of balls remaining in a similar position to where they were within the break.
Two or more object balls that are touching or are close together.
This is a bank shot that goes off of the head rail and then straight to the pocket at the other end of the table.
The 5 out (meaning the player getting the handicap can win by making the 5, 6, 7, 8 or 9 balls).
Using knowledge of the game and one's own abilities and limitations to choose the manner of shooting and the particular shot from an array presented, that has a degree of likelihood of success. This often requires a player to forego a shot that if made would be very advantageous but does not have a high likelihood of success, in favor of a safety or less advantageous shot that is more realistically achievable.
When a player is playing flawlessly, just "cannot miss" and the game seems effortless.
A material, usually leather, placed on the end of a cue stick that comes in contact with the cue ball.
The normal phenomenon where the object ball is pushed in a direction very slightly off the pure contact angle between the two balls. Caused by the friction imparted by the first ball sliding past or rotating against the other ball.
This is the state after which the person returning the break has had the opportunity to catch and even the field after the breakers advantage.
The sides of a table's frame upon which the elastic cushions are mounted. May also be used interchangeably with cushion.
To win an inning that counters a good game your opponent just won.
The inning win that counters a good game your opponent just won.