Definition of games on the wire

To give a handicap to an opponent where they have to win a specified number less games than the other player in order to triumph in the match. The name refers to posting games on the scorekeeping mechanism known as a wire, though it is employed when no actual use of the particular device is available or intended.

24 Random Essential Billiards Terms

American Cuemakers Association. This organization was formed in 1992 to help bring value to the development and advancement of cues in the United states.
A break shot in which the object is to leave the incoming player with no shot or a very difficult shot, such as is normally employed in the opening break of straight pool. Cf. open break.
"Pocket billiards," or a game in which balls are shot into pockets.
This describes a shot in snooker where the cue contacts more than one object ball.
A stroking technique in which a player releases his gripping hand briefly and re-grasps the cue farther back on the butt just before hitting the cue ball.
A semicircle with an 11½ inch (291 mm) radius, drawn behind a snooker table's baulk line, centred on the middle of the line, and resembling the upper case letter "D" in shape. The "D" is also used in English billiards and sometimes also in blackball and other pool games played on British-style tables.
This is the apex ball in the triangle, racked on the foot spot in a normal game.
This is what is brought to the table if you are playing at your best potential.
Slang term for the cue ball.
Same as spot
A particular shot where the object ball hits or grazes another object ball on the way to its pocket or toward hitting yet another object ball.
A combination shot, where hitting the first ball rubs it against the center connecting line of two frozen object balls throwing the second out.
This is a type of shot that is executed by an object ball caroming off of another object ball in order to gain the pocket.
This refers to the cluster of balls remaining in a similar position to where they were within the break.
The act of setting up the balls for a break shot. In tournament play this will be done by the referee, but in lower-level play, players either rack for themselves or for each other depending on convention.
This is English that turns into reverse English after contact with the object ball. This will close up the angle on a bank.
A point bead on a scoring string.
The deciding match between two tied opponents. Compare hill, hill.
This is a game played with the same balls and similar scoring methods of carom, but with pockets on the table, and more scoring opportunities awarded when certain balls are sunk in combination.
Chiefly British: bank shot played up and down the longer length of the table off a short rail and into a corner pocket, as opposed to the more common bank across the short length into a center pocket or corner.
Local Bylaws are additional rules, policies, and procedures unique to an area in addition (or subtraction) to established Pool/Billiards/Snooker league rules. They are designed to cover local situations.
See two-shot carry.
A Carom game with lines drawn to form rectangles that restrict play and reduce the potential for high runs.
Also littles, little ones, little balls. In eight-ball, to be shooting the solid suit (group) of balls (1 through 7); "you're little, remember", "you're the little balls" or "I've got the littles". Compare small, solids, reds, low, spots, dots, unders; contrast big.