Definition of feather shot

A very thin cut shot in which the cue ball just brushes the edge of an object ball. "Feather" by itself can be both noun and verb (e.g. "feathering the ball").

24 Random Essential Billiards Terms

This is a particular shot where the potential for a miscue is higher because of the amount of draw that is attempted on the cue ball.
This is to direct the cue ball by barely contacting an object ball.
The 'Lady Jane Grey' is a rarely used term to describe a shot in the game of snooker. The cue ball is baulk side of the spotted black after potting a red ball. The black is powerfully potted into a top corner pocket and the cue ball bounces off the top cushion into the red balls, moving them into space, thus allowing the continuation of a break. Named after Lady Jane Grey, the 16th Century Queen of England, possibly because the speed the cue ball must be hit matches the speed with which she was deposed from the throne.
This is a unique game played on a table with smaller pockets. The balls are racked in a typical pyramid, but after the break any ball can be the cue ball, and you can score by hitting a ball in or by putting the ball in after bouncing it from another object ball.
Cueing and timing the balls well; in good form, where pocketing (potting), safety and clarity of thinking seem to come easily.
The ball meant to be struck and sunk in your called shot.
This is a series of angled rails present within some pool tables that directs pocketed balls to a central location on the table for retrieval after the game.
Chiefly British: The rail at the Top of the table. Compare foot rail; contrast Bottom rail.
Cut Throat is a game of pocket billiards created to support three or five players. Balls are assigned to each player, and the purpose is to sink all the opponent's balls first to eliminate the other players.
Also massé shot. A steep curve or complete reversal of cue ball direction without the necessity of any rail or object ball being struck, due to extreme spin imparted to the cue ball by a steeply elevated cue. For Example: shooting with extreme english by holding the cue at a position of 30-90 degrees while applying left or right spin.
British: Same as cling, and kick.
In the UK, one of the two pockets one either side of a pool, snooker or English billiards table halfway up the long rails.
Same as angle of reflection.
To intentionally rebound the cue ball off both of the pocket points to achieve position.
A predetermined number of games, usually played for a specified sum of money. Contrast race (a predetermined number of wins). Informally, sets may refer to gambling more generally, as in "I've been playing sets all day", even when the format is actually races or single games.
See two-shot carry.
This is the apex ball in the triangle, racked on the foot spot in a normal game.
A soft joint-like plastic or linen base material. It lets the cue whip, putting more English on the cue ball.
This is the final object ball you need to pocket in order to win a game of one pocket.
In snooker, the highest-value baulk colour, worth 4 points.
When the object ball lies behind another ball which makes it impossible to be struck by the cue with a direct hit.
A ball hanging over the edge of a pocket.
Used in snooker in reference to the position of the cue ball. It is above the object ball if it is off-straight on the baulk cushion side of the imaginary line for a straight pot (e.g. "he'll want to finish above the blue in order to go into the pink and reds"). It is also common to use the term high instead.
A joint type which makes it possible to screw and unscrew the butt and shaft very quickly; faster than standard threads.