Definition of drop pockets

Netted or cupped pockets that do not return the balls to the foot end of the table by means of a gutter system or sloped surface beneath (they must instead be retrieved manually).

24 Random Essential Billiards Terms

Also lows, low, low ones. In eight-ball, to be shooting the solid suit (group) of balls (1 through 7); "you're low, remember", "you're low balls" or "I've got the lows." Compare solids, reds, little, spots, dots, unders; contrast high.
This is a special shaped leather or plastic bottle that is used on the table during play in special pocket games.
This is to win a game by pocketing enough balls before you opponent.
When a ball is given as a handicap it often must be called (generally tacit). A wild handicap means the ball can be made in any manner specifically without being called.
Chiefly Australian: Same as a force follow shot.
Common slang in the US for a cheap, poorly made cue. Compare wood.
The Union Mondiale de Billard (French for World Union of Billiards) is the world governing body for carom (carambole) billiard games. The organization was founded in Madrid, Spain on 1 June 1959, and is dedicated to promoting the modern carom billiards games. The UMB monitors and controls international carom competitions and tournaments, and organizes an annual World Three-cushion Billiards Championship.
A Baulk line is line drawn across the table 29 inches from the bottom cushion and parallel to that cushion.
When you hit the object ball you are aiming for (or the manditory next ball) without the cue ball hitting other object balls first.
A bridge formed by the hand where no finger loops over the shaft of the cue. Typically, the cue stick is channeled by a "v"-shaped groove formed by the thumb and the base of the index finger.
To intentionally rebound the cue ball off both of the pocket points to achieve position.
A short and loose stroke performed in a manner similar to the way one throws a dart; usually employed for a jump shot. See also nip draw.
American Cuemakers Association. This organization was formed in 1992 to help bring value to the development and advancement of cues in the United states.
Chiefly American: The short rail at the foot of the table. Frequently used imprecisely, to mean foot cushion. Compare top rail; contrast head rail.
Nickname for the nine ball, usually only used when playing the game 9-Ball.
One of the two pockets one either side of a pool table halfway up the long rails. They are cut shallower than corner pockets because they have a 180 degree aperture, instead of 90 degrees. In the UK the term centre pocket or middle pocket are preferred.
This is a series of angled rails present within some pool tables that directs pocketed balls to a central location on the table for retrieval after the game.
This is the highest number of consecutive points scored during an inning of continuous pool play.
Same as centre pocket.
A player's turn at the table, also known as an inning.
In snooker, a situation where the scores are tied after all the balls have been potted, and the black ball is re-spotted and the first player to pot it wins. The players toss for the first shot, which must be taken with the cue ball in the D. A safety battle typically ensues, until an error allows a player to pot the black, or a fluke or a difficult pot is made.
Same as side rail.
Also known as a "power draw", means applying very powerful draw on the cue ball thereby causing the maximum amount of draw.
Means either push out or push shot, depending on the context.