Definition of custom cue

A cue made specificaly for an individual player. The term may also describe a quality product of a low volume yielding cue maker who puts more time and effort into both the design and structural integrity of the cue stick, as opposed to a cue manufacturer that builds their cues in a more assembly line fashion.

24 Random Essential Billiards Terms

The sides of a table's frame upon which the elastic cushions are mounted. May also be used interchangeably with cushion.
This is a simple method of gambling where bets are determined between each game instead of playing matches.
Adjectival expression for a player's deadly game; "watch out, he plays jam up.
A tactic employed in UK eight-ball pool in which a player calls and pots one of the balls in a favorably lying set, then plays safe, leaving as many of his/her well-placed balls on the table as possible, until the opponents commits a foul or leaves a chance that the player feels warrants an attempt at running out.
In snooker, any of the three colour balls that get spotted on the baulk line: the yellow, green or brown ball.
The horizontal plane directly in the center of the cue ball, which when hit exactly by the cue tip should impart no follow or draw.
Linen made from flax and produced in Ireland which is often used to wrap the gripping area of the butt of a cue.
A break shot in which the object is to leave the incoming player with no shot or a very difficult shot, such as is normally employed in the opening break of straight pool. Cf. open break.
The full fifteen ball set of pool or snooker object balls after being racked, before the break shot (i.e., same as rack, definition 2, and triangle, defn. 2). Chiefly British today, but also an American usage ca. World War I.
Chiefly British: Short for side spin. In Canadian usage, the term is sometimes used as a verb, "to side".
Making all of the required shots in a game (rack) without the opponent ever getting to the table or getting back to the table.
Common slang in the US for a cheap, poorly made cue. Compare wood.
National Amateur Pool League.
Used with an amount to signify money added to a tournament prize fund in addition to the amount accumulated from entry fees (e.g. "$500 added").
To apply chalk to the tip of your cue before a shot.
This refers to the cluster of balls remaining in a similar position to where they were within the break.
Chiefly American: The cushion on the foot rail. Compare top cushion; contrast head cushion.
In snooker and other British usages, a break of 50-99 points (100 points or more being called a century), which involves potting at least 12 consecutive balls (i.e. the last 3 reds with at least 2 blacks and a pink, followed by all the colours).
To move a ball (usually deliberately) from a safe position, e.g. close to the middle of a cushion or in a cluster, so that it becomes pottable.
These are fouls made in one turn and then on the next by the same player each time. Some games have a rule that a player will lose the rack or match with three succesive fouls.
This is a very easy and safe shot to execute in the game of one pocket.
This is English that turns into reverse English after contact with the object ball. This will close up the angle on a bank.
Cueing and timing the balls well; in good form, where pocketing (potting), safety and clarity of thinking seem to come easily.

1- Shortened phrase of "ball-in-hand".

2 - In snooker, the ability to place the cue ball anywhere inside the boundaries of the D. This occurs at the start of a frame, and after the cue ball has been potted or forced off the table.
Also a short form of "Ball In Hand".