Definition of cinching a shot

When complete focus allows you to execute quality billiards play with simplicity and seeming ease.

24 Random Essential Billiards Terms

Same as follow (top spin).
To intentionally rebound the cue ball off both of the pocket points to achieve position.
This is the way your hand is configured to support the shaft of the cue during a shot.
This technique works to keep your shot aligned by eyeing your shot above the table, and then locking your chin into position as you lower down to take your shot.
The act of playing a devastating safety which leaves the opponent in a situation where it is very difficult or near impossible to make a legal hit on an object ball
This is to execute a shot where the cue ball is controlled perfectly and stops where you want it to exactly.
This is a player that will regularly loose money to a particular player that is obviously a better player.
Also called a rake. A special stick with a grooved, slotted or otherwise supportive end attachment that helps guide the cue stick - a stand-in for the bridge hand. It is usually used only when the shot cannot be comfortably reached with a hand bridge. Often shortened to bridge or called a bridge stick. An entire class of different mechanical bridges exist for snooker, called rests (see that entry for details), also commonly used in blackball and English billiards.
To bungle a shot in a manner that leaves the table in a fortuitous position for the opponent. Contrast sell the farm.
When the tip of the cue begins to hang over the sides of the ferrule from constant use. This is the action of mushrooming, and it is important to use a tip tool to reshape the tip to fit the ferrule.
Name for the ball that when pocketed, wins the game, or any ball that when made results in a payday such as a way in the game of Chicago.
Means either push out or push shot, depending on the context.
Also littles, little ones, little balls. In eight-ball, to be shooting the solid suit (group) of balls (1 through 7); "you're little, remember", "you're the little balls" or "I've got the littles". Compare small, solids, reds, low, spots, dots, unders; contrast big.
Also bar box, pub table, tavern table. Distinctive pool tables found in bars/pubs/taverns, and often in various other venues such as family entertainment centers and arcade rooms at bowling alleys. They are almost always coin-operated and smaller than tables found in pool halls. Typical bar boxes are 3.5 ft (1.1 m) × 7 ft (2.1 m).
Artistic pool is a trick shot competition, inspired by the related discipline of artistic billiards.
Also straight eight-ball. Same as bar pool. Not to be confused with the games of straight pool or straight rail.
A joint type which makes it possible to screw and unscrew the butt and shaft very quickly; faster than standard threads.
This describes a shot where you bank the object ball off of a rail and then sink it in a side pocket.
A British term for someone with little experience or understanding of the game, who may be skilled at potting individual balls but does not consider tactics such as position or safety; "he's a potter not a player." See also banger.
Nickname for the nine ball, usually only used when playing the game 9-Ball.
A specific way of holding the shaft in your hand. The closed hand bridge is a hand bridge where the index finger wraps over the cue stick for control.
Slang term for the cue ball.
This is the way a ball rolls when impeded by something on the table or a blemish in the cloth, often times regular players will remember certain rolls and play to them.
This is a certain type of system used to determine who plays first in the next game. These methods are not synonymous with pool skills, and are more along the lines of flipping a coin, paper-rock-scissors, or drawing straws.