Definition of chalk up

To apply chalk to the tip of your cue before a shot.

24 Random Essential Billiards Terms

This is to take all the money from a player or to have lost all of your own money.
As a result of the opening break shot (the "snap"), usually said of winning by pocketing the money ball ("won on the snap", "got it on the snap", etc.) Employed most commonly in the game of nine-ball where pocketing the 9 ball at any time in the game on a legal stroke, including the break shot, garners a win.
A type of rest, with a straight shaft and "x"-shaped head for resting the cue upon.
Making all of the required shots in a game (rack) without the opponent ever getting to the table or getting back to the table.
This is to direct the cue ball by barely contacting an object ball.
Chiefly British: The rail at the Top of the table. Compare foot rail; contrast Bottom rail.
This is a certain type of system used to determine who plays first in the next game. These methods are not synonymous with pool skills, and are more along the lines of flipping a coin, paper-rock-scissors, or drawing straws.
Also Gentleman's call. An informal approach to the "call-everything" variation of call-shot, common in bar pool. Obvious shots, such as a straight-on or near-straight shot for which the shooter is clearly aiming and which could not be mistaken for another shot, need not be called. Bank shots, kicks, caroms and combinations are usually less obvious and generally must be called, though this may depend upon the mutual skill level and shot selection perception of the players. An opponent has the right to ask what the shooter's intention is, if this is unclear.
Also topspin, top-spin, top. Same as follow. Contrast bottom spin, back spin.
Chiefly British: The cushion on the top rail. Compare foot cushion; contrast bottom cushion.
The non-red colored ball meant to be pocketed in a game of snooker, or the next ball meant to be pocketed in a particular game.
An intentionally amateurish stroke to disguise one's ability to play.
Also littles, little ones, little balls. In eight-ball, to be shooting the solid suit (group) of balls (1 through 7); "you're little, remember", "you're the little balls" or "I've got the littles". Compare small, solids, reds, low, spots, dots, unders; contrast big.
A type of spin imparted to the cue ball to make it rebound from a cushion at a shallower angle than it would if the spin had not been used.
A form of Carom billiards for the masters of the game. Played the same way with two cue balls and a single object ball. Except, in between hitting the opponent's cue ball and the object ball your cue ball must bounce off of three rails (this game is played with an unpocketed specially sized table).
Any shot in which the cue ball or an object ball has to squeeze by (just miss with almost no margin for error) another ball or balls in order to reach its intended target.
Name for the ball that when pocketed, wins the game, or any ball that when made results in a payday such as a way in the game of Chicago.
Also known as Free-stroking. This is slang for when a player begins to play untroubled and relaxed because they have built up a substantial lead.
A shot in which the cue ball is driven first to one or more rails, then hits an object ball and kisses back to the last rail contacted. It is a common shot in carom games, but can be applied to such an instance in any relevant cue sport.
This is when a mistake is made in the shot and the resulting contact between balls forces you to miss the shot.
This is a style of play where the player is required to stay on top of all the scoring practices. Scratches and points will disappear if they are not remembered.
This is to step up to the table and successfully execute a difficult shot.
Also in the zone. Describes an extended period of functioning in dead stroke ("She's in the zone").
American Cuemakers Association. This organization was formed in 1992 to help bring value to the development and advancement of cues in the United states.