Definition of center spot

24 Random Essential Billiards Terms

Same as visit.
This is the apex ball in the triangle, racked on the foot spot in a normal game.
Side spin on the cue ball that causes it to unnaturally roll off a cushion (contacted at an angle) against rather than with the ball's momentum and direction of travel. If angling into a cushion that is on the right, then reverse english would be right english, and vice versa. The angle of deflection will be steeper (narrower) than if no english were applied. The opposite of running english, which has effects other than simply the opposites of those of reverse english.
In snooker, the second-highest value colour ball, being worth six points.
To seal the pores of a wooden cue's shaft or to smooth out minor dents in the shaft by rubbing vigorously with some material.
To similarly vigorously rub the edge of a cue tip (especially a new one) to fortify it against mushrooming and ensure that it is perfectly flush with the ferrule.
New Zealand Billiards and Snooker Association.
This is to use running english or soft speed in order to open up the angle on a particular bank shot.
When two objects balls are lined up so that you aim to pocket the nearest object ball, the second object ball will pocket. "That was an easy combination shot, the six ball was wired to the four ball". Also wired combination/combo, wired kiss.
This is the way your hand is configured to support the shaft of the cue during a shot.
Also highs, high balls, high ones. In eight-ball and related games, to be shooting the striped suit (group) of balls (9 through 15); "you're high balls" or "I've got the highs" ("you're high" is rare, because of the "intoxication" ambiguity). Compare stripes, yellows, big ones, overs; contrast low.
Also lady's aid or girly stick. A denigrating term for the mechanical bridge.
This is a player that will regularly loose money to a particular player that is obviously a better player.
This describes when a player is trapped behind a ball. (n.) - This is also the amount of money a player is down after betting.
Anything that causes a foul according to the rules of a game.
In snooker and British pool, the successful potting of all object balls-on in a single frame.
Also called a rake. A special stick with a grooved, slotted or otherwise supportive end attachment that helps guide the cue stick - a stand-in for the bridge hand. It is usually used only when the shot cannot be comfortably reached with a hand bridge. Often shortened to bridge or called a bridge stick. An entire class of different mechanical bridges exist for snooker, called rests (see that entry for details), also commonly used in blackball and English billiards.
Short for left english (side), i.e. spin imparted to the cue ball by stroking it to the lefthand side of its vertical axis. Contrast right.
Also swan rest. A type of rest, similar to a spider in that the head is raised by longer supporting legs, but instead of a selection of grooves on the top for the cue to rest in there is only one, on the end of an overhanging neck, so that a player can get to the cue ball more easily if the path is blocked by two or more obstructing balls. Also known as the goose neck.
"Pocket billiards," or a game in which balls are shot into pockets.
This is an object ball that essentially covers up a path necessary for sinking the desired object ball.
The World Professional Billiards and Snooker Association, founded in 1968 and based in Bristol, England, United Kingdom is the governing body of professional snooker and English billiards. It sets the sports' rules, organises tournaments and the pro-am and pro tours, and engages in various promotional activities.
Any system for banking or kicking balls multiple rails which uses table diamonds as aiming references.
Same as duck. Derives from an easily shot ball "hanging" in the pocket.
Chiefly British: The cushion on the top rail. Compare foot cushion; contrast bottom cushion.