Definition of carom

A particular shot where the object ball hits or grazes another object ball on the way to its pocket or toward hitting yet another object ball.

24 Random Essential Billiards Terms

This describes a shot in carom games where the cue ball is driven all the way across the long rail, crossing the table, to score a point.
This is a special shaped leather or plastic bottle that is used on the table during play in special pocket games.
To seal the pores of a wooden cue's shaft or to smooth out minor dents in the shaft by rubbing vigorously with some material.
To similarly vigorously rub the edge of a cue tip (especially a new one) to fortify it against mushrooming and ensure that it is perfectly flush with the ferrule.
When a successful non penalized break is achieved which gives the object balls a broad spread on the table.
A situation where the cue ball is directly in front of another ball in the line of the shot such that the player is hampered by it, having to bridge over it awkwardly with the likelihood of a foul looming if the object ball is inadvertently touched.
To disguise the level of one's ability to play in various ways such as using a lemonade stroke; intentionally missing shots; making an uneven game appear "close"; purposefully losing early, inconsequential games. Sandbagging is a form of hustling, and in handicapped leagues, considered a form of cheating. See also dump and on the lemonade.
To take one's two-piece cue stick apart. When done before a game's conclusion, it often indicates that the game is conceded.
Local Bylaws are additional rules, policies, and procedures unique to an area in addition (or subtraction) to established Pool/Billiards/Snooker league rules. They are designed to cover local situations.
This is a low bet in a game with action.
A British term (especially in snooker) for the splitting of a group of balls when another ball is sent into them, typically with the intent of deliberately moving them with the cue ball to develop them.
See two-shot carry.
This can be a shot where the best option for you is to sink a ball in you opponents pocket in the game of one pocket. This can also refer to the act of offering an opponent a ball adjustment to even the playing field.
Same as cue.
This is the apex ball in the triangle, racked on the foot spot in a normal game.
The triangular device, generally plastic, used to group the balls in a pyramid form prior to the beginning of a game.
This is when a ball is spotted because of a foul or a handicap.
The lamentable practice of not following through with the cue straight, but veering off in the direction of the shot's travel or the side english is applied, away from the proper aiming line; a common source of missed shots.

An attempt of a legal clean shot (not a slop shot) that goes badly wrong due to improper stroke, stance, table position or table conditions in which the result of the shot is completely unexpected and not what was predicted at all.

In snooker, where the cue ball is resting in contact with another ball. If this ball is a ball that may legally be hit, then it is allowable to simply hit away from it and it counts as having hit it in the shot. If the ball moves, then a push shot must have occurred, in which case it is a foul.
This is to execute a shot where the cue ball is controlled perfectly and stops where you want it to exactly.
Same as feather (US) or snick (UK)
A game that basically cannot be lost based on disparity of skill levels; "this game is a lock for him."
Also swan rest. A type of rest, similar to a spider in that the head is raised by longer supporting legs, but instead of a selection of grooves on the top for the cue to rest in there is only one, on the end of an overhanging neck, so that a player can get to the cue ball more easily if the path is blocked by two or more obstructing balls. Also known as the goose neck.
This term refers to a foul in snooker golf.