Definition of bwa

The Billiards World Cup Association. The Billiards World Cup Association (BWA) was a governing body for carom billiards, like its competitor and successor, Union Mondiale de Billard. After staging several three-cushion billiards championships, BWA met its demise in 2004 due to financial problems and failing relations with the UMB, leaving the latter as the only carom governing body.

24 Random Essential Billiards Terms

A tight, Spandex glove covering usually most or all of the thumb, index finger and middle finger, worn on the bridge hand as a more convenient and less messy alternative to using hand talc, and for the same purpose: a smooth-gliding stroke.
This is the red colored object ball in carom games.
In snooker, any of the 15 balls worth 1 point each that can be potted in any order. During the course of a break a player must first pot a red followed by a colour, and then a red and colour, etc., until the reds run out and then the re-spotted six colours must be cleared in their order. Potting more than one red in a single shot is not a foul - the player simply gets a point for each red potted.
In blackball, one of two groups of seven object balls that must be potted before the black. Reds are spotted before yellows, if balls from both group must be spotted at the same time. Compare stripes; contrast yellow ball.
In carom billiards, the object ball that is neither player's cue ball.
This is a location where a player can go inexpensively to refine their pool skills. These establishments began as horserace betting houses, and are still often filled with games involving money action. If you get thirsty, many pool halls offer cold refreshments, however, be careful you are not there just for the refreshments. In that case, you may as well be playing at a bar with a bent cue on a rain table.
A players skill level, ball advantage or match advantage when using a handicapping system.
The person who is a provider of all or part of a player's stake (money) for a gambling session in which one is not a player.
Any ball that may be legally struck by the cue ball.
This is when you strike a cue ball off center to gain control on the movement on the cue ball.
To intentionally rebound the cue ball off both of the pocket points to achieve position.
When the rules of the opening break are broken. Ex: If not enough balls contact with rails off the break.
The placement of player(s) automatically in a tournament where some have to qualify, or automatic placement in later rounds.
Jargon for a tournament chart, showing which players are playing against whom and what the results are. Often shortened to card.
Same as gapper
Describes the propensity of pockets to more easily accept an imperfectly aimed ball shot at a relatively soft speed, that might not fall if shot with more velocity ("that ball normally wouldn't fall but he hit it at pocket speed"). The less sensitive to shot-speed that a pocket is, the "faster" it is said to be.
Describes the velocity of an object ball shot with just enough speed to reach the intended pocket and drop. "Shoot this with pocket speed only, so you don't send the cue ball too far up-table."
This is a tool that is used to shape a cue stick. It holds the cue in place while rotating it along a cutting edge. This tool can also be used to hold the cue in place while constructing or repairing other parts on the cue.
Same as feather (US) or snick (UK)
Slang for a mechanical bridge.
This is a tip tool for cleaning the edges of you tip after mushrooming occurs.
The angle from which a ball rebounds from a rail, as measured from the perpendicular to the rail.
This refers to the cluster of balls remaining in a similar position to where they were within the break.
Only $2,099.00
Time Left:
1d 13h 27m 14s
Only $2,500.00
Time Left:
19d 8h 53m 31s
Chiefly Australian: Same as a force follow shot.
Similar to run out, but more specific to making all required shots from the start of a rack. Also known as also break and run or break and dish.
Verb form: to shoot. The use of the cue to perform or attempt to perform a particular motion of balls on the table, such as to pocket (pot) an object ball, to achieve a successful carom (cannon), or to play a safety.
This is English that turns into running action after contact with the object ball. This will open up the angle on a bank.
Given to the opposite player after a scratch on the cue ball has been played. This means the player with the cue ball in hand can position it wherever on the table he pleases. Sometimes there are restrictions as to where on the table the ball can be placed: in the kitchen, within the half circle, within the D. This is also known as cue ball in hand.