Definition of break cue

A pool cue designed for breaking. Along with sometimes having unusual weight or balance to build maximum speed for the cue ball, some break cues have stiffer shafts and special breaking cue tips to transfer energy more efficiently to the cue ball.

24 Random Essential Billiards Terms

Random method for pairing of opponents when setting up a bracket system for a tournament.
This is a certain type of system used to determine who plays first in the next game. These methods are not synonymous with pool skills, and are more along the lines of flipping a coin, paper-rock-scissors, or drawing straws.
Usually a one-piece cue freely available for use by patrons in bars and pool halls.
In the eight-ball game variant blackball, also known as eight-ball pool, a differently colored but otherwise identical replacement for the red group (i.e., what would be the solids in an American-style pool ball set).
This is when you strike a cue ball off center to gain control on the movement on the cue ball.
This is a bank in one pocket pool that is sitting at an angle that makes it unsafe to play.
The intersection of the head string and long string, which is usually not marked on a table with a spot decal, unlike the foot spot, though some pool halls mark both spots so that racking can be done at either end of the table, and wear on the cloth from racking and breaking is more evenly distributed.
Same as foot spot. Chiefly British today, but also an American usage ca. World War I.
Describing a ball that is safe because it is in close proximity to one or more other balls, and would need to be developed before it becomes pottable.
When a player is on the receiving end of a devastating safety where it is very difficult or near impossible to make a legal hit on an object ball.
A pool room employee who plays with a good degree of skill.
Also massé shot. A steep curve or complete reversal of cue ball direction without the necessity of any rail or object ball being struck, due to extreme spin imparted to the cue ball by a steeply elevated cue. For Example: shooting with extreme english by holding the cue at a position of 30-90 degrees while applying left or right spin.
A cue made specificaly for an individual player. The term may also describe a quality product of a low volume yielding cue maker who puts more time and effort into both the design and structural integrity of the cue stick, as opposed to a cue manufacturer that builds their cues in a more assembly line fashion.
A three cushion billiards shot in which the cue ball first strikes two cushions before hitting the first object ball then hits a third cushion before hitting the second object ball. So called because the shot opens up like an umbrella after hitting the third rail. Umbrella shots may be classified as inside or outside depending on which side of the first object ball the cue ball contacts.
This is to step up to the table and successfully execute a difficult shot.
Be in a game where either because of disparity in skill level, or because of a handicap given, it would be very difficult to lose.
Same as spot
A shot that only a novice or fool would take. Usually because it is a guaranteed scratch or other foul, or because it has a low percentage of being pocketed and is likely to leave the opponent in good position.
Also on the lemon. Disguising the level of one's ability to play.
This is the imaginary line that a ball would need to follow in order for it to result in an effective bank shot.
Describing a difficult pot: "the awkward cueing makes this shot missable."
Same as solids, in New Zealand. Compare little, small, reds, low, spots, dots; contrast overs.
In the game 9 Ball, making the nine ball early with a legal shot, but not on the break.
When you hit the object ball you are aiming for (or the manditory next ball) without the cue ball hitting other object balls first.