Definition of break and run

Also known as "Break and Dish". In pool games, when a player breaks the racked object balls, pockets at least one ball on the break, and commences to run out the remaining object balls without the opponent getting a visit at the table.

24 Random Essential Billiards Terms

When the object ball lies behind another ball which makes it impossible to be struck by the cue with a direct hit.
This is playing to a higher winning score than eight in the game of one pocket.
This is a handicapping method where one player gets the break, and is allowed to choose any ball afterwards to put in their pocket.
In certain carom billiards games, any shot in which the cue ball is sucessfully caromed off an object ball to strike another object ball (with or without contacting cushions in the interim) is a considered a billiards shot.
Same as cloth (deprecated; it is factually incorrect).
Successive games won without the opponent getting to the table; a five-pack would be a package of five games.
This is the imaginary line that a ball would need to follow in order for it to result in an effective bank shot.
A slang term for a cue, usually used with "piece", as in "that's a nice piece of wood".
The upper portion of a cue which slides on a player's bridge hand and upon which the tip of the cue is mounted at its terminus. It also applies to the main, unsegmented body of a mechanical bridge.
This is to win a game by pocketing enough balls before you opponent.
The inside walls of a pocket billiards table's pockets.
Same as visit.
A requirement under some pocket billiards rulesets that either an object ball be pocketed, or at least four object balls be driven to contact the cushions, on the opening break shot.
Verb: "To Clock" To carefully note the abilities or betting inclinations of other players for future reference.
Also in the zone. Describes an extended period of functioning in dead stroke ("She's in the zone").
This refers to the distance of deflection that the ball comes off of the cue stick after a hit is applied with side spin on it.
A phrase used in snooker to describe the scenario whereby there are not enough available points on the table to level the scores for the frame, therefore the trailing player needs his/her opponent to foul in order to be able to make up the deficit. The name comes from the fact that this would normally have to be achieved by placing the leading player in foul-prone situations such as difficult snookers.
Any shot where the cue ball stops immediately after hitting an object ball. Generally requires a full hit.
This is the raised portion on the side of the table; the cushions are essentially rubber bumpers covered in the table cloth.
An intentionally amateurish stroke to disguise one's ability to play.
This is to direct the cue ball by barely contacting an object ball.
In snooker, the abandonment of a frame upon agreement between the players, so that the balls can be set up again and the frame restarted with no change to the score since the last completed frame. This is the result of situations, such as trading of containing safeties, where there is no foreseeable change to the pattern of shots being played, so the frame could go on indefinitely.
In pool, placing of the object balls back in the rack, after a foul break.
In snooker, a phrase used to describe a situation where the player has an easy pot and in general the balls are in a position to go on to make a sizeable break.
When the object balls in straight rail pool are lined up close to each other, but extending out from the cushion, and you choose to bounce off the first object ball at the cushion and then come back to graze the second object ball. This technique can be used to continue scoring points as long as you are efficient with the shot.