Definition of bed

The surface of the table used for play (often made with slate).

24 Random Essential Billiards Terms

Same as foul
Refers to a person gambling when he has no money. As in, "That jerk can't pay up, he was shooting air barrels the whole time".
In one pocket pool this means that you change your play based on where the count is during the game. If you are ahead you might choose more conservative shots, and if you are behind you could choose more aggressive shots.
Slang term for the cue ball.
Also goose neck rest. Same as swan.
Also semi-massé shot. A moderate curve imparted to the path of the cue ball by an elevated hit with use of english (side); or a shot using this technique. Also known as a curve (US) or swerve (UK) shot. Compare massé.
This is a shot in snooker where the cue ball follows a struck object into the pocket.
A phrase used in snooker to describe the scenario whereby there are not enough available points on the table to level the scores for the frame, therefore the trailing player needs his/her opponent to foul in order to be able to make up the deficit. The name comes from the fact that this would normally have to be achieved by placing the leading player in foul-prone situations such as difficult snookers.
This is a ball that is resting on the edge of a pocket, and would be a very easy shot to pocket.
This is also used to describe the ball when it rests on the edge of the pocket, almost begging to drop.
A set practice routine.
In British terminology, a bank shot.
The ornamentation on a cue, between the wrap and the joint, is often made by inlaying exotic materials into the wood so the inlays form points. The value of a cue is often based on the number points.
Descriptive of any game in which the object balls must be struck in numerical order. Billiard researcher Mike Shamos observes that it would be more intuitive to call such games "'series' or 'sequence'". The term actually derives from the set-up of the game Chicago, in which the balls are not racked, but placed numerically around the table along the cushions (and must to be shot in ascending order). Other common rotation games include pool (obviously), nine-ball, seven-ball, ten-ball.
To fail to make a legal shot.
This is a type of shot that shows complete control over the object ball and the cue ball.
This is a timing device for monitoring and restricting shot times for a player.
More commonly known as "straight pool", it was for many years the most popular game in pool and the game on which all World Championships were based.
14.1 is a call-shot game played with all 15 numbered balls and cue ball. Every ball pocketed counts as one point and a game is played to a agreed up score, generally 50, 100, or 150 points.
Traditional straight pool matches are played to 150 points.14.1 is also called "continuous pool" because, after the opening break, play continues until a player reaches the winning score. When only one numbered ball is left on the table, the remaining 14 are racked (with the apex ball missing), and play continues.
The placement of player(s) automatically in a tournament where some have to qualify, or automatic placement in later rounds.
A point bead on a scoring string.
In snooker, the colour ball worth 5 points, whose spot is at the center of the table.
Also straight eight-ball. Same as bar pool. Not to be confused with the games of straight pool or straight rail.
When complete focus allows you to execute quality billiards play with simplicity and seeming ease.
A pocket; usually used in disgust when describing a scratch (e.g., "the cue ball's gone down the sewer").
This is a shot where the cue ball double kisses in order to direct the object ball toward the pocket.
The rules played in a particular venue not necessarily in comportment with official rules, or with common local bar pool custom.