Definition of baulkline

A Baulk line is line drawn across the table 29 inches from the bottom cushion and parallel to that cushion.

24 Random Essential Billiards Terms

An attempt of a legal clean shot (not a slop shot) that goes badly wrong due to improper stroke, stance, table position or table conditions in which the result of the shot is completely unexpected and not what was predicted at all.

This shot refers to using heavy follow to push through an object ball on its way to its destination.
This is a shot that attempts to move a number of balls onto your side of the table in a kind of herding attempt.
Extreme application of draw. This when the draw back of the cue ball is your first priority, and you apply extra draw to the hit of the cue ball.
The 'Lady Jane Grey' is a rarely used term to describe a shot in the game of snooker. The cue ball is baulk side of the spotted black after potting a red ball. The black is powerfully potted into a top corner pocket and the cue ball bounces off the top cushion into the red balls, moving them into space, thus allowing the continuation of a break. Named after Lady Jane Grey, the 16th Century Queen of England, possibly because the speed the cue ball must be hit matches the speed with which she was deposed from the throne.
"Pocket billiards," or a game in which balls are shot into pockets.
To disguise the level of one's ability to play in various ways such as using a lemonade stroke; intentionally missing shots; making an uneven game appear "close"; purposefully losing early, inconsequential games. Sandbagging is a form of hustling, and in handicapped leagues, considered a form of cheating. See also dump and on the lemonade.
A short and loose stroke performed in a manner similar to the way one throws a dart; usually employed for a jump shot. See also nip draw.
This term refers to a foul in snooker golf.
A point bead on a scoring string.
The full fifteen ball set of pool or snooker object balls after being racked, before the break shot (i.e., same as rack, definition 2, and triangle, defn. 2). Chiefly British today, but also an American usage ca. World War I.
With draw, as in "I shot that low left", meaning "I shot that with draw and with left english". Derives from the fact that one must hit the cue ball below it's equator, i.e. "low" on the ball, to impart draw. Contrast high.
A pocket; usually used in disgust when describing a scratch (e.g., "the cue ball's gone down the sewer").
Chiefly American, and largely obsolete: Same as referee.
This is the act of keeping your ball location advantages the way they are, and not allowing your opponent to even things out in the game of one pocket.
A joint type which makes it possible to screw and unscrew the butt and shaft very quickly; faster than standard threads.
This is a term used in slang to reference the bridge tool.
Same as spot
Same as angle of reflection.
This is when a ball is spotted because of a foul or a handicap.
A joint type in which the butt and shaft screw together in a tight lock, resulting in a better shot with more hitting power.
This term is much like rain table and refers to a table is playing soggy due to humid conditions.
The object ball involved in a key shot.
Same as solids, in New Zealand. Compare little, small, reds, low, spots, dots; contrast overs.