Definition of banger

This word is used as slang to define a player as amateur or recreational.

24 Random Essential Billiards Terms

Same as side rail.
Same as gutter table. A table with a ball return system, as opposed to a drop pocket table.
The white ball struck by the cue (and so used to strike other colored, numbered, object balls) during play.
This is how the player is who is does not break before they get a chance to get out of the break. This time period is when the breaking player with a position advantage on the table.
Australian: Defeated with all seven of one's object balls (in blackball or eight-ball) remaining on the table.
A shot that has a positive outcome for the player, although it was not what the player intended. Examples of flukes include an unexpected pot off several cushions or other balls having missed the pocket aimed for, or perhaps a lucky safety position after having missed a pot. Compare fish and slop; contrast mark (sense 3) and call. It is customary to apologise to one's opponent if one does this.
This is a shot where the cue ball double kisses in order to direct the object ball toward the pocket.
Inadvertent english placed on the cueball by a failure to hit it dead center on its horizontal axis. It is both a common source of missed shots and commonly overlooked when attempts are made to determine the reason for a miss. In UK parlance this is usually called 'unwanted side'.
Chiefly American: The cushion on the head rail. Compare bottom cushion; contrast foot cushion.
A game that basically cannot be lost based on disparity of skill levels; "this game is a lock for him."
This term refers to a low percentage one pocket shot.
Area on the corner of a carom table, which is defined by a line between the second diamond on the side rail and the first diamond on the end rail, where only three successive points are allowed before the object ball must be cleared out of the area.
When the tip of the cue begins to hang over the sides of the ferrule from constant use. This is the action of mushrooming, and it is important to use a tip tool to reshape the tip to fit the ferrule.
Also string off. Chiefly British; Obsolete: Same as string or lag.
In eight-ball, when all object balls are balls-on for either player.
A description of a break shot in which the rack (pack) is spread apart well. See also the open break requirement in some games' rules, including eight-ball and nine-ball.
In carom billiards, descriptive of play in which the balls are not gathered.
Describes tightly woven and well-used (but clean) billiard table cloth (baize), upon which the balls move quickly and roll farther, as they experience less friction than with fuzzy or dirty cloth. May be used more extendedly, as in "this is a really fast table". Fast cloth makes draw (screw) shots somewhat less effective, as there is less purchase for the cue ball's back spin. By the same token, slide and stop shots are easier on fast cloth because it is so comparatively smooth.
This is your pocket for sinking balls in a one pocket game.
This is the point on the object ball where the cue exactly impacts or the point at which two balls touch when they impact.
This is a very easy and safe shot to execute in the game of one pocket.
When complete focus allows you to execute quality billiards play with simplicity and seeming ease.
To indicate where something is to be done. To "mark the pocket" means to indicate which pocket you intend to sink an object ball.
The 'Lady Jane Grey' is a rarely used term to describe a shot in the game of snooker. The cue ball is baulk side of the spotted black after potting a red ball. The black is powerfully potted into a top corner pocket and the cue ball bounces off the top cushion into the red balls, moving them into space, thus allowing the continuation of a break. Named after Lady Jane Grey, the 16th Century Queen of England, possibly because the speed the cue ball must be hit matches the speed with which she was deposed from the throne.
Chiefly British: The rail at the Top of the table. Compare foot rail; contrast Bottom rail.
Same as stripes, in New Zealand. Compare yellows, high, big ones; contrast unders.