Definition of apex of the triangle

24 Random Essential Billiards Terms

This is another name for One Pocket pool.
Also treble. A British term for a type of bank shot in which the object ball is potted off two cushions, especially by sending it twice across the table and into a side pocket. Also called a two-cushion double.
In APA, once a player has received at least 10 scores in a format, they will have established their skill level. Their established skill level can go up or down depending on their performance and is calculated by the APA's Equalizer Handicap System.
This is a very easy and safe shot to execute in the game of one pocket.
This is a shot that attempts to move a number of balls onto your side of the table in a kind of herding attempt.
A tournament format in which a player is out of the tournament after a single match loss.
This is a series of angled rails present within some pool tables that directs pocketed balls to a central location on the table for retrieval after the game.
One of the alternating turns players (or doubles teams) are allowed at the table, before a shot is played that concedes a visit to his/her opponent (e.g. "he ran out in one visit"). Usually synonymous with inning as applied to a single player/team, except in scotch doubles format.
Describes a ball rolling along a rail in contact or near contact with it, or which makes multiple successive contacts with the rail.
Either of the two shorter rails of a billiards or pocket billiards table.
A player of cue sports.
Describes a player who needs only one more game win to be victorious in the match.
Making all of the required shots in a game (rack) without the opponent ever getting to the table or getting back to the table.
Used by itself often with "low" and "high": "that's a low-percentage shot for me", "I should really take the high-percentage one".
This is a timing device for monitoring and restricting shot times for a player.
A British term for a pot that requires very fine contact between cue ball and object ball. See also feather.
The cue ball's position after a shot. "Good" or "bad" in reference to a leave describe respectively and advantageous or disadvantageous position for the next shot, or to leave an incoming opponent safe.
Short for right english (side), i.e. side spin imparted to the cue ball by stroking it to the right-hand side of its vertical axis. Contrast left.
This is the portion of your cue below joint, and includes the forearm, handle, sleeve, and the cap. Usually made with exotic wood and creatively designed to be pleasing to the eye, and often times wrapped at the handle, this is the attractive portion of the cue stick. (Sometimes this word is used alone to refer to the butt sleeve portion of the cue stick).
To move a ball (usually deliberately) from a safe position, e.g. close to the middle of a cushion or in a cluster, so that it becomes pottable.
To indicate where something is to be done. To "mark the pocket" means to indicate which pocket you intend to sink an object ball.
This is an imaginary player that you can attempt to run a rack against when playing a practice or training game.
When the rules of the opening break are broken. Ex: If not enough balls contact with rails off the break.
This is a term to describe 100 break points in a game of snooker.